News

Kyle Kabasares (left), physics major at University of California Merced, and Mariah Heck (right), geophysics and geology major at University of Tulsa hold signs to welcome home the DC-8 crew home from the Korean U.S. Air Quality mission. Credits: NSERC Photo / Jane Peterson

Students to Study Air Quality

Starting this week, 32 undergraduate students begin an eight-week NASA airborne science field experience designed to immerse them in the agency's Eart...

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Earth Expeditions: Josh Willis OMG Mission Update

On Friday June 3, 2016, the Oceans Melting Greenland mission had its first successful test of the system for dropping ocean probes from the Gulfstream...

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Upper part of Midgard Glacier system in southeast Greenland. Photo taken during NASA's Operation IceBridge Helheim-Kangerdlugssuap Gap B mission on May 17, 2016. Credits: NASA/Maria-José Viñas

NASA’s Operation IceBridge Completes 2016 Arctic Spring Campaign

Operation IceBridge, NASA’s airborne survey of polar ice, ended its eighth spring Arctic campaign on May 21. During their five weeks of operations, ...

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PRISM was designed to focus on hard-to-see phenomena in difficult coastal light conditions. Credits: Flickr user Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0

New NASA Instrument Brings Coasts and Coral into Focus

NASA's upcoming Coral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL) field experiment will observe entire reef ecosystems in more of the world's reef area – hund...

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Subsidence in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, from June 2009 to July 2012, as seen by NASA’s UAVSAR instrument. The measured displacements are a combination of movement of the ground and of individual structures. The inset at lower right shows the parish location within Greater New Orleans.

New Study Maps Rate of New Orleans Sinking

New Orleans and surrounding areas continue to sink at highly variable rates due to a combination of natural geologic and human-induced processes, find...

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All in the NAAMES of Ocean Ecosystems and Climate

NAAMES, or the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study, is a five-year NASA-funded study that aims to better define the relationship betw...

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Air movements over the Republic of Korea Computer simulation of wind-blown pollutants over East Asia.

Airborne Expedition Tackles Global Air Quality Problem

Next week NASA and the Republic of Korea’s National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER) embark on the collaborative Korea United States Air Q...

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About the Airborne Science Program

The Airborne Science Program within the Earth Science Division is responsible for providing aircraft systems that further science and advance the use of satellite data. The primary objectives of this program are to:

  • Satellite Calibration and Validation
  • Provide platforms to enable essential calibration measurements for the Earth observing satellites, and the validation of data retrieval algorithms.

  • Support New Sensor Development
  • Provide sub-orbital flight opportunities to test and refine new instrument technologies/algorithms, and reduce risk prior to committing sensors for launch into space.

  • Process Studies
  • Obtain high-resolution temporal and spatial measurements of complex local processes, which can be coupled to global satellite observations for a better understanding of the complete Earth system.

  • Develop the Next-Generation of Scientists and Engineers
  • Foster the development of our future workforce with the hands-on involvement of graduate students, and young scientists/engineers in all aspects of ongoing Earth science investigations.

    To meet these observing objectives ASP maintains and operates a suite of sustained, ongoing platforms and sensors on which investigators can rely from year to year. From these known capabilities the Science Mission Directorate can develop observing strategies. However, an ongoing capability will be resource-constrained and eventually technology-constrained, so that not all observing requirements will be met with the limited core capability. Therefore the program facilitates access to other platforms or sensors on a funds-available, as-needed basis, to accommodate unique and/or occasional requirements. The Program also looks for new or evolving technologies to demonstrate their applicability for Earth science. Depending on the success of the demonstrations and the observing needs, the core capability is expected to evolve and change over time. The speed and extent of change will be balanced against the need for established, known capabilities for long-term planning.