Airborne Ocean Color Imager

The AOCI is a high altitude multispectral scanner built by Daedalus Enterprises, designed for oceanographic remote sensing. It provides 10-bit digitization of eight bands in the visible/near-infrared region of the spectrum, plus two 8-bit bands in the near and thermal infrared.

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Airborne Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

The Airborne Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (AirMISR) is an airborne instrument for obtaining multi-angle imagery similar to that of the satellite-borne Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument, which is designed to contribute to studies of the Earth's ecology and climate. AirMISR flies on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California built the instrument for NASA.

Unlike the spaceborne MISR instrument, which has nine cameras oriented at various angles, AirMISR utilizes a single camera in a pivoting gimbal mount. A data run by the ER-2 aircraft is divided into nine segments, each with the camera positioned to a MISR look angle. The gimbal rotates between successive segments, such that each segment acquires data over the same area on the ground as the previous segment. This process is repeated until all nine angles of the target area are collected. The swath width, which varies from 11 km in the nadir to 32 km at the most oblique angle, is governed by the camera's instantaneous field-of-view of 7 meters cross-track x 6 meters along-track in the nadir view and 21 meters x 55 meters at the most oblique angle. The along-track image length at each angle is dictated by the timing required to obtain overlap imagery at all angles, and varies from about 9 km in the nadir to 26 km at the most oblique angle. Thus, the nadir image dictates the area of overlap that is obtained from all nine angles. A complete flight run takes approximately 13 minutes.

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Autonomous Modular Sensor

The Autonomous Modular Sensor (AMS) is an airborne scanning spectrometer that acquires high spatial resolution imagery of the Earth's features from its vantage point on-board low and medium altitude research aircraft. Data acquired by AMS is helping to define, develop, and test algorithms for use in a variety of scientific programs that emphasize the use of remotely sensed data to monitor variation in environmental conditions, assess global change, and respond to natural disasters.

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Airborne 2-Channel Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer

The Airborne Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS-II) is a very high resolution scanning tunable diode laser spectrometer which makes direct, simultaneous measurements of selectable combinations of HCl, NO2, CO, CO2, CH4, and N2O at sub-part-per-billion levels over a 3-30 second integration time. The measurement technique is based upon using tunable lead-salt and/or quantum cascade lasers operating from 3.4 to 8 microns wavelength scanning over absorption lines at 10 Hz recording second harmonic spectra. The instrument features an open-cradle multipass Herriott absorption cell with 15.24-cm diameter spherical zerodur mirrors coated with gold on chrome. The separation between the mirrors is adjustable allowing for a relatively small cell (0.75-m to 1.5-m) to contain an optical path length up to 120-m, depending on the spacing of the mirrors. Lasers and detectors are contained in a lightweight aluminum liquid nitrogen Dewar which can achieve a 28-hour hold time with only a 2 liter charge of liquid nitrogen. The instrument features custom laser current drives, signal chains, InSb detectors and preamps, 16-bit signal averager, analog signal conditioner, and digital I/O which are controlled by an onboard Pentium processor. Data is written to a ruggedized 2-Gb hard disk every 30 seconds and simultaneously transmitted via telemetry to ground station computers which provide backup storage of the data. The instrument weighs 36 kg and requires <56 watts for operation. Additional power up to 250 watts is available for structural heaters and current draw varies with atmospheric conditions.

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