DC-8 - AFRC 11/15/18

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Flight Number: 
1314
Payload Configuration: 
OIB 2018 Configuration - ATM-Cambot, ATM-GPS/ATM-NAV, ATM-FLIR, ATM-T6, ATM-T7, Gravimeter, MCoRDS, UWB Snow RADAR, and piggybacks ARMAS & Tinman
Nav Data Collected: 
Yes
Total Flight Time: 
10.3 hours
Flight Segments: 
From:SAWHTo:SAWH
Start:11/15/18 13:02 Z Finish:11/15/18 23:18 Z
Flight Time:10.3 hours
Log Number:198006PI:Joseph MacGregor
Funding Source:Bruce Tagg - NASA - SMD - ESD Airborne Science Program
Purpose of Flight:Science
Comments:The NASA DC-8 OIB team completed the baseline Thwaits 2002 mission today. All OIB remote sensing instruments operated nominally with good results (with the exception of ATM SWIR which lost data on 2nd half of the mission). The aircraft returned to Ushuaia with no write-ups.
Flight Hour Summary: 
198006
Flight Hours Approved in SOFRS345.8
Total Used292.8
Total Remaining53
198006 Flight Reports
Date Flt # Purpose of Flight Duration Running Total Hours Remaining Miles Flown
10/02/181287Check2.62.6343.20
10/08/181289Transit10.112.7333.10
10/08/181290Transit2.815.5330.30
10/10/18 - 10/11/181291Science11.527318.80
10/11/18 - 10/12/181292Science11.638.6307.20
10/12/18 - 10/13/181293Science11.349.9295.90
10/13/18 - 10/14/181294Science10.760.6285.20
10/15/18 - 10/16/181295Science11.171.7274.10
10/16/18 - 10/17/181296Science10.181.82640
10/18/18 - 10/19/181297Science11.192.9252.90
10/19/18 - 10/20/181298Science10.8103.7242.10
10/20/18 - 10/21/181299Science10.7114.4231.40
10/22/18 - 10/23/181300Science11.1125.5220.30
10/27/18 - 10/28/181301Science11.3136.82090
10/30/18 - 10/31/181302Science11.7148.5197.30
10/31/18 - 11/01/181303Science11.3159.81860
11/01/181304Transit0.6160.4185.40
11/03/18 - 11/04/181305Science11171.4174.40
11/04/181306Science10.8182.2163.60
11/05/181307Science10.4192.6153.20
11/07/181308Science10.4203142.80
11/09/18 - 11/10/181309Science11.1214.1131.70
11/10/18 - 11/11/181310Science10.6224.7121.10
11/11/181311Science10.8235.5110.30
11/12/181312Science10.7246.299.60
11/14/18 - 11/15/181313Science11.2257.488.40
11/15/181314Science10.3267.778.10
11/16/18 - 11/17/181315Science10.1277.8680
11/19/181316Transit3.4281.264.60
11/21/181317Transit11.6292.8530

Flight Reports began being entered into this system as of 2012 flights. If there were flights flown under an earlier log number the flight reports are not available online.

Related Science Report: 

OIB - DC-8 - AFRC 11/15/18 Science Report

Mission: 
OIB
Mission Summary: 

Mission: Thwaites 2002
Priority: Baseline
 
This mission is an amalgamation of previous OIB Thwaites flights, and is primarily intended to retain the portions of those flights which in turn repeated the 2002 NASA/Chilean lines. This mission yields a very long dh/dt time history of measurements along these lines.
 
Today’s mission was relatively to easy to select, given that all other options were clouded in and that is a baseline mission. Both observations and models indicated a significant area of downstream Thwaites Glacier that was both presently clear and also forecast to clear further during the day due to increasing outflow. Indeed, those are the conditions we encountered, and the mission proceeded successfully with regularly excellent views. Nearly all instruments reported successful operation throughout. Headwall SWIR channels again experienced an issue halfway through the mission that could not be resolved.
 
Sebastian Marinsek from the Argentine Antarctic Institute (IAA) organization joined both this mission and the previous one.
 
Attached images:
1. Map of today’s mission (John Sonntag / NASA)
2. Close-up of tabular icebergs near the Thwaites Glacier terminus. Note the tremendous amount of fresh snow softening the edges of the normally very angular icebergs (John Sonntag/NASA).
3. A few clouds near the summit of Mount Murphy (Ray Perigo/Indiana University).
4. The new B-46 iceberg, recently calved from Pine Island Glacier, at bottom center, surrounded by its smaller brethren (John Sonntag/NASA).
5. More geometric tabular icebergs, off Pine Island Glacier (John Sonntag/NASA).
6. Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (above the left wingtip), near Mount Murphy. These periodic cloud formations occur in the presence of wind shear, where wind varies sharply with altitude (Dave Porter/Columbia University).

Images: 

Close-up of tabular icebergs near the Thwaites Glacier terminus. Note the tremendous amount of fresh snow softening the edges of the normally very angular icebergs

A few clouds near the summit of Mount Murphy

The new B-46 iceberg, recently calved from Pine Island Glacier, at bottom center, surrounded by its smaller brethren

More geometric tabular icebergs, off Pine Island Glacier

Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (above the left wingtip), near Mount Murphy. These periodic cloud formations occur in the presence of wind shear, where wind varies sharply with altitude